Dr. Amy R. Borchardt

Associate Professor of Psychology

Amy BorchardtDr. Amy R. Borchardt (Ph.D., Ohio University, 2013) holds the position of Assistant Professor and is a health psychologist. She teaches Introduction to Psychology, INT 201: Building Community, Health Psychology, Research Methods & Statistics I, Special Topics: Health Psychology lab, and Stress & Coping seminar. Her research interests include curbing the effects of stress on the cardiovascular system through various techniques. She is particularly interested in studying the effects of meditation and social support.

Education

  • B.S., Psychology, University of Wisconsin – Stevens Point
  • M.S., Experimental (Health) Psychology, Ohio University
  • Ph.D., Experimental (Health) Psychology, Ohio University

Courses Taught

  • PSY 101 – Introduction to Psychology
  • PSY 221 – Health Psychology
  • PSY 225 – Sensation & Perception
  • PSY 302 – Behavioral Statistics
  • PSY 303 – Research Methods
  • PSY 306 – Research Methods and Statistics I
  • PSY 385 – Special Topics in Psychology – Health Psychology
  • PSY 421 – Stress & Coping
  • INT 201 – Building Community

Specialty

Health Psychology

Research Interest

My research focuses on the effects of different coping strategies on reactivity and recovery from stressful events. My work primarily builds upon two theories, the Reactivity Hypothesis (Krantz & Manuck, 1984) and the Transactional Model of Stress and Coping (Folkman, 1982). The reactivity hypothesis suggests that both repeated exaggerated activation of the cardiovascular system during stress and repeated delayed recovery from stressful events can lead to cardiovascular disease. Moreover, the transactional model of stress and coping suggests that one’s reaction to an event is determined by one’s evaluation of the event and one’s ability to cope with the event. In other words, if an event is considered stressful, the individual will react to the stressor, and their recovery from the event will depend on their ability to cope with the stressful event. One known relaxation technique, used for over 3,000 years in eastern cultures as a spiritual practice, is meditation. Research into meditation began in the 1970s and is marked by numerous design flaws (e.g., one group pre-post designs, lack of randomization, unclear study methods). One of my long-term research goals is to explore the effects of meditation on the cardiovascular system while also improving the quality of research in this area.

Publications

  • Borchardt, A. R. & Zoccola, P. M. (Accepted, March 2018). Recovery from stress: An experimental examination of focused attention meditation in novices. Journal of Behavioral Medicine.
  • Heffner, K. L., Devereux, P. G., Ng, H. M., Borchardt, A. R., & Quigley, K. S. (2013) Older adults’ hemodynamic responses to an acute emotional stressor: Short Report, Experimental Aging Research: An International Journal Devoted to the Scientific Study of the Aging Process, 39:2,162-178, DOI: 10.1080/0361073X.2013.761547 (pdf)
  • Raffle, H., Ware, L. J., Borchardt, A. R., & Strickland, H. A. (2011). Factors that influence breastfeeding initiation and persistence in Ohio’s Appalachian region. Athens, OH: Voinovich School of Leadership and Public Affairs at Ohio University. (pdf)
  • Jenkins, J. R., & Borchardt, A. R. Risky sexual behavior and evidence for sperm competition in online fiction. Manuscript in preparation

Selected Presentations

  • Borchardt A. R. (2018). A pilot study of a novel expectancy effect manipulation in the context of meditation during recovery from stress. Submitted for presentation at the annual meeting of the American Psychosomatic Society, Louisville, KY.
  • Latimer, S. K.*, Karren, C.*, & Borchardt A. R. (2018). A pilot study concerning the effects of meditation on arousal between different rumination levels. Submitted for presentation at the annual meeting of the American Psychosomatic Society, Louisville, KY.
  • Ajetomobi, R.,* & Borchardt, A. R. (2017). The impact of pre-stressor videos on mood, stress responses, and performance. Poster presented at the annual meeting of the Southeastern Psychological Association, Atlanta, GA.
  • Hagin, J.,* & Borchardt A. R. (2016). Influences of gender, intent to harm, and sexual orientation on perceptions of domestic violence within the collegiate community. Poster presented at Mercer University’s annual BEAR day, Macon, GA.
  • Stewart, A.,* & Borchardt A. R. (2015). The effects of self-efficacy and message framing on food decision-making. Poster presented at Mercer University’s annual BEAR day, Macon, GA.
  • Bishop, C.,* & Borchardt A. R. (2014). The effects of stress management on perceived and physiological reactions. Poster presented at Mercer University’s annual BEAR day, Macon, GA.
  • Agouridou, M.,* & Borchardt A. R. (2014). Visually impaired and sighted kids with musical training were compared on: Phonological awareness, auditory working memory and selective attention. Poster presented at Mercer University’s annual BEAR day, Macon, GA.
  • Borchardt, A. R. & Patterson, S. M. (2013). Meditation after a Stressor may Lead to Improved Physiological Recovery. Poster presented at the 2013 annual meeting of the Association for Psychological Science, Washington, D.C.
  • Borchardt, A. R., & Patterson, S. M. (2012). The effect of meditation on cortisol: A comparison of meditation techniques to a control group. Poster presented at the 2012 annual meeting of the Society of Behavioral Medicine, New Orleans, LA.
  • Borchardt, A. R., & Heffner, K. L. (2008). Social support and speech anxiety effects on physiological reactivity. Poster presented at the 2008 annual meeting of the American Psychosomatic Society, Baltimore, MD.
  • Borchardt, A. R., & Heffner, K. L. (2006). Social support effects on physiological reactivity during anticipation of social evaluation.Poster presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychosomatic Society, Denver, CO.

*Indicates student co-author

Contact Dr. Amy R. Borchardt


(478) 301-2822
borchardt_ar@mercer.edu